Chelsea in line for Quadruple

Chelsea have already won the Carling Cup and this win keeps alive their Quadruple challenge as they are still in the hunt for the FA Cup, Premiership and Champions League. In each of these tournaments they may face main rivals Manchester United:
Wednesday, 9 May Barclays Premiership. Update 0-0 ManU won the Premiership
Saturday, 19 May FA Cup Final. Update 1-0 ManU. Drogba as usual in extratime
Wednesday, 23 May Champions League Final. Update if they had beaten their opponents in the semis

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The Week article on budding juniors

In another part of Chennai, three young girls are busy on the court at the ICL Squash Academy. One of them has a board examination the next day and the other two have homework to finish, but the thwack of the racquet has pulled them to the court for an hour. A tired lot they might be, but these youngsters have a clear focus on why they are sweating it out. They are all in the sport to win, and win big. “When you start is an important factor in sport,” says national squash coach Cyrus Poncha. “It gives you an edge over competitors.”

One of his students at the academy, Anaka Alankamony, is realising the benefits of starting early. Though she started with tennis, she shifted to squash during a summer camp and bagged major titles recently. Cyrus foresees Anaka playing with experts like Saurav Ghoshal. “Anaka is a fighter, very determined in the court,” says Cyrus. That determination saw her finish third in the British Junior Squash Open at Sheffield in January. Squash has always been tagged as elitist, but players call it cost-effective. Being an indoor sport, it can be played round the year and is not affected by climatic changes. “Racquet and shoes together might cost about Rs 5,000. But, one cannot guarantee longevity of the racquet as it can get damaged if it hits the wall,” says Cyrus.

The logistics has worked out perfectly well in Anaka’s case. A student of class eight, she spends most of her pocket money and time on squash. “I practice for at least an hour every day,” she says. Staying in Chennai is a big advantage for her and other squash enthusiasts like Harita Omprakash, 16, and Aprajitha Balamurukan, 14. “Chennai is the hub of squash infrastructure,” says N. Ramachandran, secretary-general, Squash Racquet Federation of India. “Tamil Nadu is undoubtedly first in the national squash scene. Youngsters keen to master squash come here because of the infrastructure.”
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